Herri Mina

herrimina

Pétrus is at the absolute apogee of the wine world. And it isn’t just a trophy wine for people with far too much money, although it is that, in part. Just like some other untouchables (DRC comes to mind) the château actually makes utterly sublime wines that show the utmost respect for local tradition and terroir.

That the wine is so honest and true to itself is in no small part thanks to Jean-Claude Berrouet, who oversaw 40 vintages there, including many of the great wines that put Pétrus into the wine world’s pole position.

But Berrouet wasn’t satisfied playing only at those rarefied heights: he also craved that quintessentially French experience of working on more modest, humbler wines—country wines. So, like DRC’s Aubert de Villaine (who founded his incredible Côte Chalonnaise Domaine de Villaine for similar reasons) he had side projects where he (and now his son, who also succeeded him as Pétrus’ winemaker) could connect his hands with soil in terroirs that he knew were both truly great and wildly undervalued, and make wine ordinary people can actually afford to drink.

One of the side projects, Herri Mina, which we talked about in this space a while back, is out in France’s Basque country—Berrouet’s land of origin. You see, feeling homesick, Berrouet moved back to work the local terroir, growing Cabernet Franc (Pétrus’ other grape) and Irouléguy’s excellent native white varieties.

Now, these wines are not like Pétrus… and that’s OK! Pétrus just isn’t the bottle to open for steak off the backyard grill on a hot summer night. But these wines are perfect! The Herri Mina’s pretty fruit and subtle tobacco and earth notes put it somewhere between Bordeaux and Saumur-Champigny stylistically—but with its own special character. 2014 is a very good vintage in Irouléguy (not as hot as ’15) and the wine has perfect balance.

And don’t forget the white! It is dense, complex, full of fruit and mineral. If Txakoli is an expression of the Basque seaside, think of this Irouléguy Blanc as an expression of its mountains. Both are serious wines, despite the great price, and would benefit from a little cellaring or decanting.

Herri Mina, Irouléguy Blanc, 2013 – $28.99

Herri Mina, Irouléguy Rouge, 2014 – $29.99

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