Flatiron's Guide to German Wine, Part 2: Key Wine Regions of Germany

Flatiron's Guide to German Wine, Part 2: Key Wine Regions of Germany

The defining characteristic of German wines are their bright, fresh and zippy acidity. The cool weather helps in this regard, but so does its grape varieties, matched over centuries with their best-suited site. The best way to intimately get to know German wines is to start here: with a crash course in some of the top subregions.

Clara Dalzell
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Flatiron's Guide to German Wine, Part 1: Introduction to the Wines of Germany

Flatiron's Guide to German Wine, Part 1: Introduction to the Wines of Germany

We set out to write this Flatiron Guide to German Wines to explain not just why the wine geeks go so nutty for all things Deutsch, and not just why German wines are among the best wines for the super-casual wine drinker. And not even why we are so deeply in love with them, ourselves. 

No, we set out to explain why a German wine is the bottle you should take home tonight. You. Yes, you.

Clara Dalzell
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Beaujolais and the Rise of Natural Wines

Beaujolais and the Rise of Natural Wines

20 years ago, “natural wine” was the freaky stuff drunk after-hours in Williamsburg and the East Village. Today, collectors around the world chase bottles of natural wine as passionately as DRC – and pay top dollar for some of them.

Where did natural wine come from, and how did it spread so far and so fast? 
In a word: Beaujolais! 

Joshua Cohen
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Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 5: Austria Looking Forward

Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 5: Austria Looking Forward

Austria is not just a tiny place with time honored traditions and amazing terroir. It is a model for the future of wine. Their remarkable renaissance, taking them from bulk wine blenders to quality wine wunderkinds, was just the beginning. For a glimpse of the future of wine, look no further than Austria!
Clara Dalzell
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Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 4: Burgenland & Steiermark Hit the Spot

Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 4: Burgenland & Steiermark Hit the Spot

Few things are as exciting as realizing you are experiencing an undiscovered phenomenon. Like your cousin who was playing Nirvana tapes before they hit the radio, or the line cook flipping burgers next to Danny Meyer. You vibrate with the energy of the thing, you can’t wait for it to infect everyone else. You start passing out cassette tapes and inviting your friends out to dinner.

Today, that’s me and Burgenland.

Clara Dalzell
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Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 3: Niederösterreich is Never a Bad Idea

Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 3: Niederösterreich is Never a Bad Idea

With such diversity it can be hard to summarize the region’s wine style. But to us, the heart of the matter is that Lower Austria gives us authentic wines. And best of all, they do this at incredibly fair prices.
Clara Dalzell
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Georgia On My Mind (Part 2)

Georgia On My Mind (Part 2)

Amber Waves of Taste

There’s been a lot of talk recently about “orange wines”: white varieties macerated and fermented on their skins, taking on an amber hue. The examples that exist are largely from “natural” winemakers and are usually sold to people interested in the novel or edgy bottles of the world. The truth is, however, that these “amber wines” (as they should be more aptly called) are anything but novel. At the foot of the Caucus Mountains in, what is known today as, the Republic of Georgia, this style of winemaking has been going on for many thousands of years. Yet, Americans are just beginning to discover them as the small country emerges from the oppression of Soviet rule.

The crux of what makes “traditional” Georgian wine different is the use of Qvevri. Qvevri is the proto-amphora clay vessel used in traditional Georgian winemaking which has been adopted by many western European winemakers. Qvevri are large tear-drop shaped vessels, anywhere from 1,000-3,000 liters in volume, made from clay and buried in the ground. Once harvested, red or white grapes are crushed under foot and the entire mash (seeds, stems, skins and juice) put into the Qvevri. The vessels are sealed using wet clay and a slab of slate, then covered with dirt or sand. Depending on the rate of fermentation (almost always spontaneous), the vessel might be unsealed for occasional punch down to prevent overflowing. Due to the shape of the Qvevri, the fermentation process creates a convection cycle which suspends the solid matter evenly through the liquid medium. As fermentation finishes, the cap naturally settles, effectively filtering the wine.

When this traditional method is employed for white varieties, such as Rkatsiteli, Chinuri or Mitsvane, the resulting wine is a rich amber color. Also referred to as “orange” wines, the style has emerged recently on the international wine scene from producers in Italy, France, and Spain and even from the New World. Gravner is largely cited as the first winemaker to use Qvevri outside Georgia, but others have followed: Paolo Bea, COS, Foradori, Vinos Ambiz, Bernhard Ott and Thierry Puzelat. Many argue that the skin contact and Qvevri fermentation increases the perception of terroir, while others say that it muddies it. However, given the coexistence of the Georgian varieties and the Qvevri technique, it’s hard to argue that these amber wines betray the place from which they come. 

So what do we serve with these amber wines? These are rich and tannic wines that have aromas of tea, fresh and dried stone fruits, north Indian and Middle Eastern Spices (saffron particularly) and nuts. This is Silk Road cuisine wine... Afghan, Persian, North Indian, and some Chinese. The cuisine of Georgia largely reflects these Eastern influences with the use of spices and nuts as flavorings and thickeners. Though a world away, other cuisines that riff on the asiatic them work equally well. Jerk chicken, BBQ and Mexican all make good partners with wines like these as well as meals with a variety of flavors earthy savory flavors.

Cheers,

Zach

 

Jeff Patten
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Georgia On My Mind (Part 1)

Georgia On My Mind (Part 1)

Of all the lesser-known wine regions of the world, the Republic of Georgia could be the most important one no one is talking about. Being surrounded by unfriendly neighbors & having been buried for most of the 20th century under Soviet control, most Americans are probably not versed in Georgian culture. But if they are wine lovers, they should be! That’s because Georgia is where wine was born and where it is still being made in much the same way it has been since the beginning.
Joshua Cohen
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Madeira: A Wine Lover's Guilty Pleasure

Madeira: A Wine Lover's Guilty Pleasure

If you've ever gotten a little tired of wine as it is, you should feel guilty.  The wines of the world are as different and changing as the light of day.  But, if maybe you might have had any doubts that there was wine enough in the world to dazzle you forever, then you might want to try Madeira.  It's an effective go-to for fine-tuning your taste buds and refreshing your palate for the good old Reds and Whites.
Jeff Patten
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