Featured Wines on Both Coasts!

Featured Wines on Both Coasts!

Hi everyone! 

If you are a regular customer of Flatiron Wines, you already know that we are always looking for wine stories that get us excited to share with you. The best source for these stories (and our deepest discounts) is to subscribe to our newsletter. If you aren't already signed up, you are missing out!! Sign up right now!

New York Newsletter Sign Up can be found HERE.

San Francisco Newsletter Sign Up can be found HERE.

But, we've started a very exciting blog series! On each of our local blogs (SF and NY), we are featuring an extended version of our favorite newsletter story every Thursday. You can read previews of this week's Features below. Feel free to click through to read the full posts and, if so inclined, buy the wines! We're truly thrilled to bring you more, richer, deeper wine stories to your attention. This is what we love to do! 

New York

Sometimes, when I’m feeling especially bold, I’ll tell people that Sherry is like Champagne. (notably, without the bubbles.) No matter how true this statement is, it still elicits a reaction somewhere between confusion and outright disbelief. 

We know that Champagne is for celebrations, imbued with good taste--often with the price tag to match. I don’t have to be psychic to guess what you’re thinking: “but, isn’t Sherry that sweet stuff my aunt tipped out of a jug that she hid under the kitchen sink?” And yes, that may be true for some. But recently, I attended an industry event, a lunch, comparing the spectacular wines of Valdespino to our favorite Champagnes. I kid you not: this illustrated, beyond a doubt, that Valdespino has more in common with venerated Champagne Growers than grocery store “sherry,” (except in price).

Read more about Valdespino's mindblowing sherry.

 

San Francisco

For lovers of Piedmontese wines, the name Oddero is synonymous with both quality and history. Most would be surprised there is not only one Oddero in the Langhe. Especially because there was precisely only the one until 2006. 

From 2006, when the brothers Luigi and Giacomo Oddero split the estate, until his death in 2010--Luigi set out to build his own label from scratch. Sadly his passing left big shoes to fill in the winery. In 2012 Luigi’s family hired Dante Scaglione, a talented winemaker who had been working for Bruno Giacosa for over two decades. A traditionalist to his core, Dante has had a tremendously positive influence on the wines. And by hiring the talented young winemaker Francesco Versio, who also worked at Giacosa, it seems a future of classically styled wines bearing the name Luigi Oddero is bright indeed.

Read more about Luigi's Oddero.

Maggie Scudder