Rosé At Home: Taste With Us

Rosé At Home: Taste With Us

We want to take a moment, as the holiday weekend dawns on us, to talk with you about how to organize an at-home tasting! There's no better way to experience wine than with friends. And there's no better time than...you guessed it....NOW!
Andrew Chen
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Flatiron’s Rose FAQs: our simple guide to the best pink wines

Flatiron’s Rose FAQs: our simple guide to the best pink wines

What gives rosé wines their pink color?

Rosé is usually made with red-wine grapes, which have pigment in their skins.

All the color in rosé wines come from the skins of those grapes.  (We’ll talk more about wine making later in this post.)

Well, is Rosé more like white wine or red wine?

While the color of rosé wines can run the gamut from almost white to light red, people tend to drink them more like white wines than red wines. We drink rosé with a chill (the exact serving temperature depends, as with red and white wines, on all the particulars). Like white wine, many rosés are perfect for outdoor, hot day drinking: that’s why they’re mainstays of seaside vacations.

 

Joshua Cohen
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Asimov's latest The Pour post is a gem

Asimov's latest The Pour post is a gem

Eric Asimov’s latest post, "Everyday Wines: The Most Important Bottles You Will Drink," at his New York Times Blog, The Pour, is a gem.

And I’m not saying that just because he said to “find a good wine shop” with a link to his article saying that “[i]nstitutions like Chambers Street WinesFlatiron Wines & Spirits and Crush Wine & Spirits in New York are great for expert and novice alike, and they serve a nationwide clientele.” No, this has nothing to do with validation in the National Press…

It’s because Eric has, once again, nailed how we actually drink wine. His eight tips are spot on and we’d recommend you read them.  Here is a helpful link to read it now.

Joshua Cohen
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Top Ten Burgundy Producers (That you can actually buy…)

Top Ten Burgundy Producers (That you can actually buy…)

I was recently looking for some guidance on what Burgundy producers to collect and I came across a Top Ten list online. It had some names I had heard of, like Leroy, DRC, Rousseau, Leflaive, Liger-Belair and the like. Great, I thought, I’ll just start filling my cellar with those wines!

 

Just kidding. Maybe one in a thousand of you out there have enough time and money to put together an all-star Burg collection like that. But the lesson for me is that we need a real top ten list. 

Jeff Patten
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2017 Burgundy: A First Look at the Vintage

2017 Burgundy: A First Look at the Vintage

What’s the big picture on the 2017 vintage? What’s the one thing I need to know?

At this point, most commentators are saying that they like the vintage very much. We’ll break that down for you in further detail below. It’s also a very abundant vintage. After nearly a decade of below-average yielding vintages, the Burgundians will actually have some wine to sell — the most since 2009.

Jeff Patten
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A Simple Guide to German Riesling: Flatiron Wines’ German Riesling 101

A Simple Guide to German Riesling: Flatiron Wines’ German Riesling 101

What is Riesling?

Riesling is a noble white grape that makes aromatic white wines.

Riesling grapes make a huge range of still, white wines ranging from bone-dry to unctuously sweet. Riesling is famously good at giving a taste of the terroir in which it is grown. So, for example, Riesling grown in France’s Alsace region will taste very different from Riesling grown in Germany.

Jeff Patten
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Aglianico: An FAQ

Aglianico: An FAQ

What is Aglianico?

Aglianico is a grape variety grown in Southern Italy, mostly in Campania and Bascilicata. Most experts consider Aglianico to be one of Italy's "noble" varieties, alongside Sangiovese and Nebbiolo. It is the grape that makes Taurasi, the most famous red wine from south of Tuscany.

Jeff Patten
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Cru Bourgeois 101

Cru Bourgeois 101

If you love wine, especially Bordeaux, you need to pay special attention to this category. It provides some of the very best values in the world for red wines in the $20 - $50 range. And I’m going to explain why in a short series of posts.
Jeff Patten
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Sauvignon Blanc FAQ's

Sauvignon Blanc FAQ's

What is Sauvignon Blanc?

It is a white wine grape variety. It's "home" is in the Loire Valley, but it is one of the French grapes, like Chardonnay, that has become a widely planted and widely consumed "international" grape variety. As many consumers decided that Chardonnay was too "oaky and buttery", many of them moved to Sauvignon Blanc, which is typically crisper, more fruit forward, and more herbaceous.

 

Jeff Patten
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Edges of Burgundy: Pernand-Vergelesses

Edges of Burgundy: Pernand-Vergelesses

More so than any of the other villages covered in this Edges of Burgundy series, Pernand-Vergelesses qualifies for its Edges status thanks to both its red wine and its white wines.  Don't be surprised by this: P-V lies just beneath Corton, the great hill and only village (a small exception in Musigny aside) capable of making Grand Cru wine from both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. With two grapes for the price of one village, this is an area worthy of your attention. Let's get started.
Jeff Patten
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Just the Facts: Corked Wine

Just the Facts: Corked Wine

Here are the facts you need to know about corked wine!
Jeff Patten
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How Important Are Vintages?

How Important Are Vintages?

 A lot of people out there are obsessed with vintages. There are lots of forces at work here.

First, there are the wine geeks who have nothing better to do than sit around debating the merits of, say, 1989 Bordeaux versus 1990. Engaging in these discussions would seem to these folks to be a good way to demonstrate knowledge and experience.

Jeff Patten
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