Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 4: Burgenland & Steiermark Hit the Spot

Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 4: Burgenland & Steiermark Hit the Spot

Few things are as exciting as realizing you are experiencing an undiscovered phenomenon. Like your cousin who was playing Nirvana tapes before they hit the radio, or the line cook flipping burgers next to Danny Meyer. You vibrate with the energy of the thing, you can’t wait for it to infect everyone else. You start passing out cassette tapes and inviting your friends out to dinner.

Today, that’s me and Burgenland.

Clara Dalzell
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An Introduction to the Wines of Beaujolais: Why Everyone Should Love Beaujolais!

An Introduction to the Wines of Beaujolais: Why Everyone Should Love Beaujolais!

Beaujolais has been one of our favorites since we opened Flatiron. There’s probably no region that we, the Flatiron staff, drink more regularly.  This blog shares all the reasons we love Beaujolais wine and why you should too!
Maggie Scudder
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Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 3: Niederösterreich is Never a Bad Idea

Flatiron's Guide to Austrian Wine, Part 3: Niederösterreich is Never a Bad Idea

With such diversity it can be hard to summarize the region’s wine style. But to us, the heart of the matter is that Lower Austria gives us authentic wines. And best of all, they do this at incredibly fair prices.
Clara Dalzell
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The Barolo Breakdown, Part 4: Castiglione di Falletto

The Barolo Breakdown, Part 4: Castiglione di Falletto

I adore Castiglione di Falletto because it is balanced.  The best wines possess a regalness and composure that is only possible when you stray from the opposite ends of a spectrum and wander towards the happy middle.  

Here you have wines that do have intense structure and aromas – of course, as this is Barolo! – but also poise. 

Jeff Patten
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Barolo Breakdown, Part 3: Barolo

Barolo Breakdown, Part 3: Barolo

These vineyards only make up about 10% of the DOC Barolo, but they make a far larger percentage of the best known wine, and 100% of the village is entitled to produce Nebbiolo called Barolo.
Jeff Patten
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The Ultimate Guide to the Terroir of Sancerre, Part 4: Oxfordian Limestone

The Ultimate Guide to the Terroir of Sancerre, Part 4: Oxfordian Limestone

This is the fourth and final post in our complete guide to the terroir of Sancerre. We're tacking the most common soil type in the region: Oxfordian Limestone!
JR Thomason
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Our Complete Guide to Madeira: Bottled History

Our Complete Guide to Madeira: Bottled History

Madeira is a wine of history, made by mistake and crafted by circumstance. With the ability to last for hundreds of years, sometimes it is, quite literally, bottled history. It’s a region whose great fortune was mirrored in its near extinction. Now these singular wines and their makers are experiencing a resurgence into the hearts and glasses of wine drinkers on the hunt for the authentic.
Maggie Scudder
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How to Choose Your Party Bottles!

How to Choose Your Party Bottles!

Whether you're trying to please a crowd of 50 co-workers, impress a new friend, or show your appreciation to a gracious host, buying wines for a party can be tricky! Peruse this list of wines, which is organized by occasion, to find the right wine for you!
All About Self Employment Collaborator
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Rosé At Home: Taste With Us

Rosé At Home: Taste With Us

We want to take a moment, as the holiday weekend dawns on us, to talk with you about how to organize an at-home tasting! There's no better way to experience wine than with friends. And there's no better time than...you guessed it....NOW!
All About Self Employment Collaborator
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Flatiron’s Rose FAQs: our simple guide to the best pink wines

Flatiron’s Rose FAQs: our simple guide to the best pink wines

What gives rosé wines their pink color?

Rosé is usually made with red-wine grapes, which have pigment in their skins.

All the color in rosé wines come from the skins of those grapes.  (We’ll talk more about wine making later in this post.)

Well, is Rosé more like white wine or red wine?

While the color of rosé wines can run the gamut from almost white to light red, people tend to drink them more like white wines than red wines. We drink rosé with a chill (the exact serving temperature depends, as with red and white wines, on all the particulars). Like white wine, many rosés are perfect for outdoor, hot day drinking: that’s why they’re mainstays of seaside vacations.

 

Joshua Cohen
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Asimov's latest The Pour post is a gem

Asimov's latest The Pour post is a gem

Eric Asimov’s latest post, "Everyday Wines: The Most Important Bottles You Will Drink," at his New York Times Blog, The Pour, is a gem.

And I’m not saying that just because he said to “find a good wine shop” with a link to his article saying that “[i]nstitutions like Chambers Street WinesFlatiron Wines & Spirits and Crush Wine & Spirits in New York are great for expert and novice alike, and they serve a nationwide clientele.” No, this has nothing to do with validation in the National Press…

It’s because Eric has, once again, nailed how we actually drink wine. His eight tips are spot on and we’d recommend you read them.  Here is a helpful link to read it now.

Joshua Cohen
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Top Ten Burgundy Producers (That you can actually buy…)

Top Ten Burgundy Producers (That you can actually buy…)

I was recently looking for some guidance on what Burgundy producers to collect and I came across a Top Ten list online. It had some names I had heard of, like Leroy, DRC, Rousseau, Leflaive, Liger-Belair and the like. Great, I thought, I’ll just start filling my cellar with those wines!

 

Just kidding. Maybe one in a thousand of you out there have enough time and money to put together an all-star Burg collection like that. But the lesson for me is that we need a real top ten list. 

Jeff Patten
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